Alvin C. York Institute


2016-2017
Courses Offered



English

Mathematics

Social Studies

Science

Foreign Language Lifetime Wellness, PE, and JROTC Career and Technical Fine Arts


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English Mathematics


Read Right Algebra I
Grade Level: 9 Grade Level: 9
Credit: 1 (Required Elective) Credit: 1
Prerequisite: none Prerequisite: Successful Completion of 8th grade Math
Description: Read Right is an innovative approach to teaching that enables students to advance in reading comprehension, vocabulary, critical thinking, and motivates them to read for learning and pleasure.  The program is based on an interactive constructivist model of learning: learning by doing. Students are tutored in small groups at their reading level. Read Right has been in place at YAI since 2010 and has helped multiple students reach grade level.

Description: Algebra I is designed to prepare students for the End of Course exam, which is 25% of the final grade, and for Algebra II. Algebra I consists of the study of equation solving skills and applications, students learning graphing functions, relations and inequalities: properties and patterns; solving linear systems; collect represent and analyze data; permutations and combinations; and apply the Pythagorean Theorem, quadratic and distance formulas.

English I Geometry
Grade Level: 9 Grade Level: 10
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of 8th grade English Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit
Description: Throughout English I, the students focus on the following state standards/common core: language, communication, writing, research, logic, informational text, media, and literature. The student will develop the structural and creative skills necessary to produce written language that can be read and interpreted by various audiences. MLA documentation is required. The student will develop the reading skills necessary for word recognition, comprehension, interpretation, analysis, evaluation, and appreciation of the written text. The student will use, read and view media/technology and analyze content and concepts accurately. The student will express ideas clearly and effectively in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas. The class culminates with an EOC test, with the grade counting as 25 percent of the student's final average.

Description: Geometry uses problem situations, physical models, and appropriate technology to investigate and justify geometric concepts and relationships. Problem-solving situations provide all students an environment that promotes communication, engages student reasoning, and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines, and to the real world. Students will use physical models to represent, explore, develop, and apply abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students develop mathematics needed in an increasingly technological world. The concepts and topics emphasized in the course include measurement, geometric patterns, coordinate geometry, two- and three-dimensional figures, transformational geometry, congruence, similarity, inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, and proof.

English II Algebra II
Grade Level: 10 Grade Level: 11
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English I Credit Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry Credit
Description: Throughout English II, the students focus on the common core standards outlined by the state at www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/ . English II is a comprehensive course, covering short stories, movies, essays, poetry, songs, plays, and novels written by world authors. Students complete daily journals and activities consisting of their daily learning targets and ACT prep questions. Students are required to make presentations in front of the classroom dealing with their creative projects as well as when they present their papers. Students are required to utilize the five paragraph essay format to write a descriptive paper, comparison-contrast paper, movie review, and autobiography. Students complete a persuasive research paper done in MLA and present a brochure over the chosen topic. The class culminates with a State Standardized Test, with the grade counting as 25 percent of the student's seconds nine weeks grade.

Description: Algebra II is a course that uses problem situations, physical models, and appropriate technology to extend algebraic thinking and engage student reasoning. Problem-solving situations will provide all students an environment that promotes communication and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines, and to the real world. Students will use physical models to represent, explore, and develop abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students apply mathematics in an increasingly technological world. The concepts emphasized in the course include analysis of "family of functions", solving systems of equations, graphing, data analysis, and logarithmic and exponential functions.

English III Bridge Math
Grade Level: 11 Grade Level: 12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English II Credit Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II Credits
Description: Throughout English III, the students focus on the following state standards/common core: language, communication, writing, research, logic, informational text, media, and literature. English III focuses on American literature from the Colonial Period to the present. Students read and respond to various short stories, poems, essays, articles, dramas and novels, while examining various literary devices, narrative techniques, form and structure. The study of literature is accompanied by a study of vocabulary and grammar. Grammar is studied in conjunction with composition as students practice proofreading, editing, and revising skills. Student writing includes expository, analytical, and narrative essays; persuasive essays and presentations; poems; memoirs; short stories; letters; and interpretations; as well as an in-depth study of the TCAP writing assessment which they take early in the second semester. Students also perform research for various expository and/or persuasive projects and incorporate MLA documentation. The class culminates with an EOC test, with the grade counting as 25 percent of the student's final average.

Description: Bridge Math is intended for students with an ACT score below 19. This course has three main themes. I. Ways of Looking: Revisiting Concepts; I. Making Connections; and III. Applications: Ways of Looking at the World.

English IV PreCalculus
Grade Level: 12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English III Credit Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry Credits
Description: English 12 is a chronological survey course of British Literature including the following literary periods: Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and18th century, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern (late 20th century). Historical background information is included as a reference point for each literary period since the development of the English language and English literature evolved in relation to the historical events and the geographical movement of people and cultures taking place in Europe over a vast time span. All senior students in English 12 are required to complete a senior research paper where MLA documentation is required. Advanced composition skills are integrated into the study of literature. Literary essays as well as expository and persuasive essays are key components of the course of study. Emphasis on critical thinking skills, critical reading skills, and logical thinking skills are incorporated in daily lessons. Oral expression activities, vocabulary development, and computer technology are utilized to the fullest extent throughout the year. Textbook Equivalency: 12. Course Content and Objectives: This course follows the standards and performance indicators as outlined in the Tennessee English Language Arts Standards for English IV and national common core standards.

Description: Precalculus is an advanced course in which students learn to integrate trigonometry, geometry, and advanced algebra with other fields of mathematics. These along with the appropriate technologies will develop the underpinnings for calculus.

Dual Studies English 1010 and 1020 Calculus
Grade Level: 12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English III Credit and a 19 ACT on each English, Reading and Math subtest Prerequisite: Precalculus Credit
Description: This course is offered in conjunction with Roane State Community College to those students who meet the prescribed requirements. The curriculum addresses the Tennessee Curriculum Guide for grade 12 and the RSCC catalog description for Composition 1010. Course work includes writing (including research), speaking, listening, viewing and representing standards.

Description: Calculus is an advanced mathematics course where two new concepts of change and motion are studied through differentiation and integration techniques. In calculus students learn to apply all of the previous mathematical concepts to solve problems in the fields of science, engineering, business, and mathematics.

Journalism Dual Studies Math-Math 1130 College Algebra
Grade Level: 10-12 Grade Level: 12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Application; No F in an English Course; Seniors must not be first time applicants; and Editors must enroll in the course. Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry Credits and a 19 ACT on each English, Reading and Math subtest
Description: Journalism is a rewarding but high stress course. It provides students with the opportunity to hone skills in the areas of writing/editing, photography, graphic design, marketing, data-analysis and business management. Students need not have skills in all these areas, but must be highly interested and motivated to learn skills in at least one of these areas. The Journalism class is responsible for designing, creating and publishing the YAI annual/yearbook, the Mountaineer, as well as the quarterly student newspaper, Pine Needles, printed by the Fentress Courier. Creating these publications requires students to gather content from campus and community life and process that content into written copy, photography, and print media layouts. Training is hands-on. Students are assigned to teams according to their strengths. Each team must log a certain number of work hours outside of course time. These hours may include, but are not limited to, YAI extra-curricular events, after school/Saturday workdays, on-line work sessions (from home) and trips. Software use includes: Adobe InDesign and Photoshop, Microsoft Office (esp. Word and Excel), Windows Moviemaker and more. Students should be able to work well with others, and be able to give and take productive criticism. All journalism students are invited to the highly recommended, weeklong yearbook day-camp prior to the beginning of each school year. After taking the course, students are eligible to join the Journalism Club. (See instructor for details)


Description: This course is offered in conjunction with Roane State Community College to those students who meet the prescribed requirements. A course in algebraic functions, their properties and uses-equations, inequalities, graphs, systems of linear equations, graphing techniques and logarithms. Applications are in the mathematics of finance as well as the laws of growth and decay in other areas.

Social Studies Science


World History and Geography Anatomy and Physiology
Grade Level: 9-10 Grade Level: 12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Biology I, Physical Science, and Chemistry I credits
Description: In this course students will study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They will examine the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese Revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. Relevant Tennessee connections will be part of the curriculum, as well as appropriate primary source documents. Students will explore geographic influences on history, with attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nations from 1750 to the present and the subsequent human geographic issues that dominate the global community. Additionally, students will study aspects of technical geography such as GPS and GIS, and how these innovations continuously impact geopolitics in the contemporary world.

Description: Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the body’s structures and respective functions at the molecular/biochemical, cellular, tissue, organ, systemic, and organism levels. Students explore the body through laboratory investigations, models, diagrams, and/or comparative studies of the anatomy of other organisms. The study of anatomy and physiology prepares students for a variety of pursuits such as health care, sports, and fitness careers, as well as for taking an active part in their own health and wellness. The student will study Anatomical Orientation, Protection, Support, and Movement, Integration and Regulation, Transportation, Absorption and Excretion, and Reproduction, Growth, and Development.

History of the Bible Biology I
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 11
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Chemistry I
Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire an understanding and appreciation of the Bible's major ideas, historical/geographical contexts, and literary forms. The course will include the study of the Bible in its historical, sociological, and cultural contexts, and its impact on later cultures, societies, and religions.

Description: Biology I is a course that introduces students to the world of living things. This course provides a foundation for advanced scientific studies. The students explore the following: Ecology, Photosynthesis and Respiration, DNA, Basic Genetics, Biological Evolution and Diversity. This course has an EOC exam.

History of WWI & WWII Biology II
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Biology I, Physical Science, and Chemistry I credits
Description: In History of WWI & WWII, students study the time periods during both WWI and WWII. Students will utilize different learning methods to research, discuss, debate and formulate opinions on modern historical events as it relates not only to America's developing history but also the world's unfolding events. The six social studies standards of essential content knowledge and four process skills are integrated for instructional purposes. Students will utilize different methods that historians use to interpret the past, including points of view and historical context. This class will focus the history of U.S. during the WWI & WWII era and the relevant geography of the periods, including political geography as well as physical geography. The basic reference texts will be the standard curriculum texts for U.S. History. These texts are only for course outline and most topic readings will be drawn from media centers, video collections and internet sources. The purpose of the class is to study the United States participation in both WWI & WWII in a detail not permitted by current time constraints. This will be an intensive reading and writing course and will be targeted towards college-bound students. Peer-to-peer instruction in the classroom and sharing of research findings will be an important facet of the course. There will be at least two long-term research projects per semester and the keeping of a research activity portfolio will be required. Writing Assignment: Research paper and project on WWI topic

Supplemental Text: John Hersey's Hiroshima


Description: Biology II is an advanced science course that introduces students to major specialty areas of biology. The students explore the following: Comparative Anatomy and Zoology, Embryology, Genetics, Immunology, Microbiology and Botany.

United States Government and Civics Chemistry I
Grade Level: 12 Grade Level: 10
Credit: ½ Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Physical Science
Description: In U.S. Government and Civics students will study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the Constitution. Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and how to exercise these rights and responsibilities in local, state, and national government. Students will learn the structure and processes of the government of the state of Tennessee and various local governments. The reading of primary source documents is a key feature of United States Government and Civics standards.

Description: Chemistry is an academically rigorous course that explores the properties of substances and the changes that substances undergo. The student will investigate Atomic Structure, Matter and Energy, and the Interactions of Matter. Topics covered include lab safety, factor label method, physical and chemical properties/changes, metric measurement, atomic structure, ionic bonding, covalent bonding, equations, chemical calculations (the mole), and stoichiometry. Additional topics covered may include acids & bases, solutions, and/or accuracy & precision in the lab.

Economics Chemistry II
Grade Level: 12 Grade Level: 12
Credit: ½ Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Biology I, Physical Science, Chemistry I, and Algebra II credits
Description: In Economics students will examine the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present. Informational text and primary sources will play an instrumental part of the study of economics where it is appropriate. Writing Assignment: 2 Research Based Peer Reviewed Article Critiques (The Wage Gap) & (Minimum Wage)

Description: Chemistry II is a continuation of Chemistry I, but it investigates in greater depth the fundamental makeup of matter, the interactions of matter, and the energy of such interactions. Chemistry II is a rigorous course recommended for students planning to pursue a college education with a major in the science, engineering, or pre-professional medicine disciplines. The student will investigate Structure of Matter, States of Matter, and Reactions. Specific topics that will be covered include equations, gases, solutions, reaction rates, reaction equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Students will also conduct an individual scientific research project during this course, with most of the work on this being done outside of class. Students must have a strong grasp of concepts covered in Chemistry I such as equations, factor-label method, and Stoichiometry in order to be successful in this course. Students should have completed Chemistry I with satisfactory grades.

United States History and Geography Environmental Science
Grade Level: 12 Grade Level: 12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Biology I and Physical Science credits
Description: In U.S. History and Geography students will examine the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America's growing role in world diplomatic relations, including the Spanish-American War and World War I. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America's entry into World War II, as well as its consequences for American life. Students will explore the causes and course of the Cold War. Students will study the important social, cultural, economic, and political changes resulting from the Civil Rights Movement, the Cold War, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. Additionally, students will learn the causes and consequences of contemporary issues impacting their world today. Students will continue to use skills for historical and geographical analysis as they examine American history since Reconstruction with special attention to Tennessee connections in history, geography, politics, and people. Students will continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography within the context of United States history. The reading of primary source documents is a key feature of United States history standards. Finally, students will focus on current human and physical geographic issues important in contemporary America and the global society. Writing Assignment: Students will conduct a research project and write an informative paper on American time period.

Supplemental Text: John Herseys Hiroshima


Description: Environmental Science is a course that enables students to develop an understanding of the natural environment and the environmental problems the world faces. Students will investigate the following: Fundamental Ecological Principles, Human Population Dynamics, Natural Resources, Energy Sources and Their Use, Human Interaction with the Environment and Personal and Civic Responsibility. It is the expectation that students will explore the content of Environmental Science through inquiry. This science course will utilize group lab and field experiences to meet these expectations. Particular emphasis will be placed on local environments. Students will develop a basic understanding of ecology as a basis for making ethical decisions and career choices.

Physical Science
Grade Level: 9
Prerequisite: None
Description: Physical Science is a course that explores the relationship between matter and energy. Students should learn Physical Science through the process of inquiry. Hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies, and group activities should constitute a major portion of the learning experience. Using available technology, students will investigate forces and motion, the chemical and physical properties of matter, the ways in which matter and energy interact within the natural world, and the forms and properties of energy. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the entire course. Physical Science provides the knowledge, prerequisite skills, and habits of mind needed for problem solving and ethical decision-making about matters of scientific and technological concern. Physical Science offers a basic foundation for advanced studies in Chemistry and Physics.

Foreign Language Lifetime Wellness, PE, and JROTC


Spanish I Lifetime Wellness/Driver's Education
Grade Level:10-11 Grade Level: 10
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description: The course emphasizes the four basic skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Cultural topics covered include greetings, high school life, home and family, health and leisure time. All are topics with which American teenagers can identify. Students learn to use the present and some past tenses of regular and irregular verbs and direct and indirect object pronouns. CDs, videos and DVD's are used to enhance instruction.

Description: Lifetime Fitness provides students with information that enables them to make informed choices and decisions based on healthy attitudes. This is a new approach to physical education/health that is consistent with the Lifetime Wellness Curriculum Framework approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education. Lifetime Fitness stresses a lifelong process of positive lifestyle management that seeks to integrate the social, emotional, intellectual and physical self for a more productive, quality life style. Physical fitness activities include: volleyball, softball, dodge-ball, basketball, touch football, beginning weight training and other fitness games. Classroom activities include: disease prevention, nutrition, mental/emotional health, CPR & first aid, substance use and abuse, family planning and other related topics.

Spanish II Physical Education
Grade Level:10-11 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Spanish I Credit Prerequisite: None
Description: The four basic skills are again emphasized. Communication, shopping, traveling, food, etiquette and the place of the target language in a student's future career area some of the topics covered. Students use and distinguish uses of different past tenses, as well as the future tense. The use of commands is also practiced.

Description: The physical education course consists of walking, running, and rope jumping. The students are tested on the mile run at the end of one nine week period and they have a jump rope test the second nine-week period. The course also consists of team sports. Volleyball, softball, kickball, whiffle ball, soccer, basketball, and dodge ball are the primary sports that the class indulges in. Frisbees are also available for those who like to play with them. The main purpose of the P.E. program is to get students to be active while doing something they enjoy, which will at the same time enable them to live a healthier life.

German I Army Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC)
Grade Level:10-11 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description:The course emphasizes the four basic skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Cultural topics covered include greetings, high school life, home and family, health and leisure time. All are topics with which American teenagers can identify. Students learn to use the present and some past tenses of regular and irregular verbs and direct and indirect object pronouns. CDs, videos and DVD's are used to enhance instruction.

Description: JROTC teaches the value of citizenship, leadership, service to the community, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment, while instilling self-esteem, teamwork, and self-discipline. The program's mission statement is, "To motivate young people to be better citizens." Students practice leadership and become aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens while building skills in communication, government, life success, geography, and wellness in a structured interactive environment. The JROTC program is a cooperative effort on the part of the Army and York Institute, all materials and books are free, and after school and summer time extracurricular activities are available. Satisfactory completion of the program can lead to advanced placement credit in the college ROTC program or advanced rank in the Armed Forces. Several components of the course are approved for college credit that is awarded to cadets upon successful completion of specified requirements. Service learning, community service and teen anti-drug efforts are emphasized. The program is inspected annually, and currently holds the highest rating of "Honor Unit with Distinction."

German II
Grade Level:10-11
Credit: 1
Prerequisite: German I credit
Description: The four basic skills are again emphasized. Communication, shopping, traveling, food, etiquette and the place of the target language in a student's future career area some of the topics covered. Students use and distinguish uses of different past tenses, as well as the future tense. The use of commands is also practiced.



Career and Technical

Health Science Education Human Anatomy and Physiology
Grade Level: 10-12 Grade Level: 10-11
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Health Science Education credits
Description: Health Science Education is an introduction to broad standards that serve as a foundation for Health Care Occupations and function across health services. Students that are interested in the study of Health Care will be given the opportunity to learn basic skills that will be expected later on in the career. The program will serve as a means to help students develop leadership, teamwork, and technical skills. Skills presented will include but are not limited to patient rights, patient care, patient relations, and participating in youth club activities.

Description: Human Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the body’s structures and respective functions at the molecular/biochemical, cellular, tissue, organ, systemic, and organism levels. Students explore the body through laboratory investigations, models, diagrams.. The study of anatomy and physiology prepares students for a variety of pursuits such as health care, sports and fitness careers, as well as for taking an active part in their own health and wellness. The student will study Anatomical Orientation , Protection, Support, and Movement, Integration and Regulation, Transportation, Absorption and Excretion, and Reproduction, Growth, and Development.

Nursing Education Medical Therapeutics
Grade Level: 11-12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Health Science Education and Human Anatomy and Physiology credits; Students must be at least 16 years old Prerequisite: Health Science Education and Human Anatomy and Physiology credits
Description: Nursing Education is an introduction to the basic requirements that a health care taker should know. Students will learn specific skills required for most any individual that has direct contact with other individuals as a medical patient. It is planned that after the basic studies of the required patient care, each student will be provided the opportunity to enroll in the study of Certified Nursing Assistant and become certified for employment in a patient care facility.

Description: Medical Therapeutics provides knowledge and skills to maintain or change to the health status of an individual over time. This could include careers such as dental, dietetics, medical assistance, home health, nursing, pharmacy, respiratory, social work, nutritionist, Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, Veterinarian, Gerontology Service Provider, Medical Practice owner, Attorney for health care, and others.

Pharmacology
Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Health Science Education credit
Description: Pharmacological Sciences is a third-level applied course in the Therapeutic Clinical Services program of study intended to prepare students with an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the healthcare worker in a pharmacy setting. This course equips students with the communication, goal-setting, and information-processing skills to be successful in the workplace, in addition to covering key topics in pharmacology, pharmacy law and regulations, sterile and non-sterile compounding, medication safety, quality assurance, and more. Upon completion of this course, proficient students who have also completed a Clinical Internship can apply to sit for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board examination immediately after high school graduation. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects, Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics, and Tennessee state standards in Anatomy and Physiology.*

Introduction to Human Studies (FACS) Family Studies (Life Connections)
Grade Level: 9-10 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description: Introduction to Human Studies is a comprehensive, foundation course designed to assist students in developing the core knowledge and skills needed to manage their lives. Emphasis is on leadership, human development, family and parenting education, consumer economics and resource management, housing and living environments, nutrition and foods, textiles and apparel, and career preparation. Critical skills in decision making, problem solving, critical thinking, technology, work and family management, and workplace readiness are reinforced through authentic experiences. The course allows students to select specific areas for future concentrated study. A unique focus is on the management of families, work, and their interrelationships. The integration of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) provides students with opportunities for leadership development, personal growth, and school/community involvement.

Description: Family Studies is designed to empower students to take action for the well-being of themselves and others as they effectively manage the roles and responsibilities created by family, career, and community interactions. Focusing on the young adult, content includes skills and knowledge to enable students to maintain an optimum, independent living environment by making responsible young adult decisions. Students will learn to plan and set goals for a career, manage multiple roles, maintain respectful and caring relationships with improved communication skills, understand the responsibilities of parenting, cope with stress and crisis situations, provide for health and well being, and function as informed consumers. This course goes beyond core knowledge in preparing the mature student for independent, adult responsibilities. The integration of Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) provides students with opportunities for leadership development, personal growth, and school/community involvement.

Lifespan Development (Child Development) Nutrition Across the Lifespan
Grade Level: 10-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description: Lifespan Development is a specialized course that prepares students to understand the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children. The course is designed to help young people acquire knowledge and skills essential to the care and guidance of children as a parent or caregiver. Emphasis is on helping students create an environment for children that will promote optimum development. Experiences such as laboratory observations, job shadowing, or laboratory participation may be included if opportunities are available. In this course students work with preschool children at the L.B.J. and C. Head Start center. The integration of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) provides students with opportunities for leadership development, personal growth, and school/community involvement.

Description: Nutrition Across the Lifespan is a study of the nutritional needs of the different stages of growth and development throughout the life span. This course covers human anatomy and physiological systems, nutrition requirements, as well as social, cultural, and other impacts on food preparation and integrity. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study. Lifetime Wellness credit.

Computer Applications Information Technology Foundations
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Computer Applications
Description: The student will develop basic skills in using computerized programs with emphasis on the common operations. Standards relate to business documents, formatting, content, layout and design. Using special features of the Microsoft software, the student will be able to format academic and business reports. Industry production standards are emphasized. Students are evaluated on proofreading and editing skills. Students will also have the opportunity to participate with Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), which is integrated into the classes.

Description: Information Technology Foundations (ITF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Programming and Software Development, and Web Design. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of three focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web publication. Upon completion of the ITF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision about which Information Technology program of study to pursue. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics.*

Web Design Foundations Web Site Development
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Information Technology Foundations Prerequisite: Web Design Foundations
Description: Web Design Foundations is a course that prepares students with work-related web design skills for advancement into postsecondary education and industry. The course is intended to develop fundamental skills in both theory and practical application of the basic web design and development process, project management and teamwork, troubleshooting and problem solving, and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the web design and development industry; where interaction with a “client” is indicated in the standards, it is expected that students’ peers or the instructor may serve as mock clients in lieu of an actual relationship with an industry partner. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in the Web Design program of study. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics.*

Description: Web Site Development builds on the skills and knowledge gained in Web Design Foundations to further prepare students for success in the web design and development fields. Emphasis is placed on applying the design process toward projects of increasing sophistication, culminating in the production of a functional, static website. As students work toward this goal, they acquire key skills in coding, project management, basic troubleshooting and validation, and content development and analysis. Artifacts of the work completed in this course will be logged in a student portfolio demonstrating mastery of skills and knowledge. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared to pursue a variety of postsecondary programs in the computer sciences, sit for industry certification, or apply their skills in a capstone Web Design Practicum. Standards in this course are aligned with Tennessee State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Technical Subjects and Tennessee State Standards in Mathematics.*

Fundamentals of Construction Residential & Commercial Construction I
Grade Level: 9-11 Grade Level: 10-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Construction Credit
Description: Fundamentals of Construction is a course that will introduce carpentry students to basic skills and knowledge applicable to all construction trades. Topics covered include safety, construction drawings, site layout, hand and power tools, linear and angular measurements, and application of algebraic and geometric principles to construction problems.

Description: Residential & Commercial Construction I is a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge related to residential and commercial carpentry. Topics covered include wood, metal, and concrete building materials; fasteners; hand and power tools; fabrication based on construction plans; and framing of platform and post-and-beam structures, in both wood and metal. This course gives students an introduction to the skill and knowledge base typically required for apprentice carpenters.

Residential & Commercial Construction II Principles of Manufacturing
Grade Level: 11-12 Grade Level: 9-11
Credit: ½ or 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Residential & Commercial Construction I Prerequisite: None
Description: Residential & Commercial Construction II is a course in which students will extend their skill and knowledge related to residential and commercial carpentry. Topics covered include stairs, installation and trim of windows and doors, installation and repair of gypsum wallboard, advanced site layout, exterior finish work, thermal and moisture protection, and an introduction to welding. This course gives students a substantial skill and knowledge foundation typically required for apprentice carpenters. This course may be taken two semesters for a total of two credits.

Description: Principles of Manufacturingis a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge applicable to welding construction trades. Topics covered include safety, welding design drawings and layout, hand and power tools, linear and angular measurements, and application of algebraic and geometric principles to construction problems. Students will also learn basic welding skills and techniques.

Welding I Welding II
Grade Level: 10-12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit: ½ or 1
Dual Credit is also offered through TCAT-OH
Prerequisite: Principles of Manufacturing Prerequisite: Welding I
Description: Welding I is a course in which students will learn basic skills and knowledge related to cutting and welding applications. Welding and cutting skills will be developed in the context of a series of projects. Combined with the second year course, Welding Applications, the student will be prepared for entry level welding certification.

Description: Welding II is a course designed to follow Basic Principles of Welding, in which students will learn more advanced techniques and skills related to cutting and welding applications. Units of instruction in both courses include safety, oxy-acetylene cutting, plasma arc cutting, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, heat treatment of metal, blueprint reading and sketching, welding symbols and writing and math assignments related to the welding profession. This course may be taken two semesters for a total of two credits.

Dual Credit Advanced Welding Applications Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair I
Grade Level: 11-12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 per semester (may take up to 4 times) Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Should be taken in sequence
Description: Dual Credit Advanced Welding Applications Allows qualified students to be admitted to TCAT at Oneida/Huntsville and begin welding for college credit. During the 12 grade students may get special permission to stay after 4th Block to gain more hours and skills toward their Welding Certification and graduation from the college.

Description: Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair I (MLR I) course prepares students for entry into Maintenance and Light Repair II. Students explore career opportunities and requirements of a professional service technician. Content emphasizes beginning transportation service skills and workplace success skills. Students study safety, tools, equipment, shop operations, basic engine fundamentals, and basic technician skills. Upon completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses, students may enter automotive service industry as an ASE Certified MLR Technician.

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair II Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair III
Grade Level: 11-12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Should be taken in sequence Prerequisite: Should be taken in sequence
Description: Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair II course prepares students for entry into Maintenance and Light Repair III. Students study automotive general electrical systems, starting and charging systems, batteries, lighting, and electrical accessories. Hours earned in the Maintenance and Light Report courses may be used toward meeting National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) standards.

Description: The Maintenance and Light Repair III (MLR III) is the third course in the Automotive Course which prepares students for entry into Maintenance and Light Repair IV. Students study and service suspension and steering systems and brake systems. Upon completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses, students may enter automotive service industry as an ASE Certified MLR Technician.

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair IV Agriscience
Grade Level: 11-12 Grade Level: 9-10
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Should be taken in sequence Prerequisite: None
Description: The Maintenance and Light Repair IV (MLR IV) course prepares students for entry into the automotive workforce or into post secondary training. Students study and service automotive HVAC systems, engine performance systems, automatic and manual transmission/transaxle systems, and practice workplace soft skills. Upon completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses, students may enter automotive service industry as an ASE Certified MLR Technician. Hours earned in the Maintenance and Light Report courses may be used toward meeting National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) standards.

Description: Agriscience is an introductory laboratory science course that prepares students for biology, subsequent science and agriculture courses, and postsecondary study. This course consists of educational standards to prepare students for the study of any of the Agricultural pathways. This course covers ecology, biological processes, sexual and asexual reproduction, the use of technology, and the study of the chemical and physical laws that govern the agricultural industry.

Natural Resource Management (Wildlife Mgt) Large Animal Science (Livestock Mgt)
Grade Level: 9-10 Grade Level: 10-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: Agriscience credit recommended
Description: Environmental and Natural Resource Management is an applied-knowledge course for students interested in learning more about becoming good stewards of our environment and natural resources, as an environmental scientist, conservationist, forester, or wildlife manager. Students will study the wildlife and habitats necessary for good management of such. This course covers major types of natural resources and their management, public policy, the role of public education in managing resources, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry.

Description: Large Animal Science is an applied course in veterinary and animal science for students interested in learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or agriculture professions. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different groups of large animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry. This course is designed to develop basic understanding of large animal handling, health, maintenance, reproduction, selection and management. A hands-on experience is provided through the utilization of the 125 acre farm managed by the agriculture instructor. A herd of Angus cattle give students the opportunity to work with husbandry practices. The course provides students with a fundamental understanding in animal science to prepare them for advanced courses in the animal science sub-cluster. Students will learn safety factors to consider when handling; transporting issues; and selecting appropriate equipment.

Veterinary Science Greenhouse Management
Grade Level: 11-12 Grade Level: 10-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Large Animal Science Prerequisite: Principles of Plant Science and Hydroculture credit recommended
Description: Veterinary Science offers challenges for students to use advanced technologies and medical treatments to maintain the health of animals. The animal health industry continues to grow in importance and prominence as more people purchase animals for pleasure and sustenance. The advanced standards in this course will familiarize students with competencies required in a veterinary science career. This course is the advanced course of the animal systems sub-cluster and prepares students to work in a laboratory environment dealing with animal health. Some of the topics studied by students include the skill of analyzing how diseases affect the animal’s body and how they are diagnosed; vaccines and their role in animal health; the use of animal health products; evaluation of the principles of disease control in animals; examine basic surgery procedures; and assess laws and regulations involving animal diseases and animal’s well being. This course addresses standard principles of veterinarian medicine and includes new methods of treatment that will be used as we move forward in the 21 century.

Description: Greenhouse Management is another possible course offering of interest to most students is the utilization of the greenhouse. In this course, students are allowed to learn plant propagation using the various methods. Plant growth and production as well as marketing, etc is also studied to assist students with possible career exposure. This course is an applied-knowledge course designed to prepare students to manage greenhouse operations. This course covers principles of greenhouse structures, plant health and growth, growing media, greenhouse crop selection and propagation, and management techniques. It provides students with the technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in horticulture production.

Small Animal Science Landscaping & Turf Science
Grade Level: 10-12 Grade Level: 10-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Agriscience credit recommended Prerequisite: Principles of Agricultural Science
Description: Small Animal Science contains objectives to prepare students for careers in managing and caring for specialty and pet animals. As our population raises more specialty animals and pets for production purposes and personal value, careers that work with these animals in a safe environment will continue to expand. A hands-on experience is provided through the utilization of the 125 acre farm managed by the agriculture instructor. A herd of Angus cattle as well as several rabbits and poultry give students the opportunity to work with husbandry practices. Small Animal Science is an applied course in animal science where students interested in learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or agriculture professions are provided. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different groups of small animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry.

Description: Landscaping and Turf Science includes standards to prepare students for creating beautiful environments for homes and businesses. This course includes site analysis and preparation, landscape drawing, plant selection, and installation. Maintenance of healthy attractive landscapes and turf areas will be emphasized. Utilization of the school campus as well as the school farm will enhance the hands-on experiences with this course. With the increase of urban sprawl these career opportunities are increasing daily. Skills needed for further education and careers in landscape design, maintenance, and turf management will be provided. Content includes site analysis and planning, principles of design, and plant selection and care techniques. Plant science and leadership skills taught in this class will prepare students to meet the demands of this exciting industry.

Principles of Agribusiness Work Based Learning
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 11-12
Credit: 1 Credit:1
Prerequisite:None Prerequisite:Current Enrollment in a CTE Course
Description:Principles of Agribusiness teaches students to apply the economic and business principles involved in the sale and supply of agricultural products to a wide range of careers across the industry and builds foundational knowledge of finance and marketing principles. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in the Agribusiness program of study.

Description:Students in Work Based Learning work part-time and recieve on-the-job training while they are enrolled in a related class for class instruction. Individuals enrolled in the class must be 16 years of age or older and an 11th or 12th grade student. Students must have passed all their requirements up to the point of their enrollment of this class. The student is expected to maintain excellent attendance in all classes at school and work a minimum of 10 hours per week to participate in the work based educational program. The duties at work are to relate directly to the skills learned in the classroom. Each student must provide his/her own transportation to and from work. A total of 1 credit will be earned each semester. The student must be concurrently enrolled in a related class from which the student is working. The course is suggested for students that have completed a CTE focus of at least two courses within the related CTE program area prior to enrolling in Work Based Learning.

Introduction to Business and Marketing Marketing and Management I: Principles
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description: Introduction to Business and Marketing is an introductory course designed to give students an overview of the Business Management and Administration, Marketing, and Finance career clusters. The course helps students prepare for the growing complexities of the business world by examining basic principles of business, marketing, and finance in addition to exploring key aspects of leadership, ethical and social responsibilities, and careers. Students’ academic skills in communications, mathematics, and economics are reinforced with activities modeled in the context of business topics. Upon completion of Page 2 this course, proficient students will be equipped with the foundational skills to succeed in any of the Business, Marketing, or Finance programs of study and will be prepared to make an informed decision regarding which pathways they would like to pursue in high school.

Description: Marketing and Management I: Principles focuses on the study of marketing concepts and their practical applications. Students will examine the risks and challenges that marketers face to establish a competitive edge in the sale of products and services. Topics covered include foundational marketing functions such as promotion, distribution, and selling, as well as coverage of economics fundamentals, Page 2 international marketing, and career development.

Entrepreneurship
Grade Level: 10-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisite:None
Description:Entrepreneurship is an applied knowledge course that begins with the discovery process of generating new business ideas. Students research local, national, and international social and economic trends and analyze the feasibility of their own proposed businesses, both from a market demand and revenue-producing standpoint. Based on their entrepreneurial endeavors, students will prepare, write, and revise a business plan. In preparation for the business plan, students will conduct market research, study ownership structures, evaluate risks, examine startup costs, determine essential vendors, and identify sources of capital and financing options. Students will also draft, refine, and rehearse entrepreneurship pitches developed from their business plans to present during course intervals and to give final presentations at the conclusion of the course. Upon conclusion of this course, proficient students will be able to articulate, and defend, elements of a full business plan for a new business.

Fine Arts

Visual Art I General Choir (Chorus 1)
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description: Students in high school Visual Art I courses will create, evaluate, and research the historical context of works of art. The students will apply various media, techniques, and processes in the creation and analysis of artworks. Students, through practice and sequential study, will be given the opportunity to work in the areas of art production, art criticism, aesthetics, and art history. As the students progress through courses in the area of visual art, they will develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. These skills are gleaned from the study of ideas, concepts, issues, and knowledge related to the visual arts. Students will work with a variety of media.

Description: This class is offered both semesters. Basic music reading skills and vocal training are the main objectives to be obtained in this class. Students will learn to sing in three to four part harmony. Students must be willing to participate in an orderly, dependable manner. This class is a feeder program for Advanced Choir. This class may perform with the Advanced Choir during the semester upon the discretion of the director and the skill level of the ensemble as a whole. Students should take this class as a prerequisite to taking Advanced Choir. Solo work is not required but is encouraged.

Advanced Choir Music Theory/Class Piano
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: General Choir (Chorus 1) credit Prerequisite: None
Description: Students should have had at least one semester of General Choir and participate in an audition before taking this class. Exceptions are made if student has had previous musical background in private study of voice, piano, or instrument. This class is the performing group for school, community, and state performances and competitions. Students will be participating in several performances incorporating concert and show choir arrangements as well as participating in collegiate vocal clinics and master classes. Students are encouraged to take this class both semesters in order to fully benefit from the extra-curricular opportunities.

Description: This class is offered both semesters. Students learn basic music theory as well as piano technique. Students work independently at their own pace beginning with the performance level they enter under. Students are expected to complete theory assignments weekly with tests given periodically. Students are required to participate in weekly class recitals with a public recital given at the end of the semester.

Theatre Arts I (Drama) Guitar
Grade Level: 9-12 Grade Level: 9-12
Credit: 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None
Description: In Theatre Arts I students will write scripts through improvising, drafting, and refining scripts based on experience and heritage, imagination, literature, and history. Students will act by developing, communicating, and sustaining characters in improvisations and in informal and formal productions. Students will design and produce by conceptualizing and realizing artistic interpretations for informal and formal productions. Students will direct by interpreting dramatic texts and organizing and conducting rehearsals for informal or formal productions. Students will research by evaluating and synthesizing cultural and historical information to support artistic choices. Students will compare and integrate art forms by analyzing traditional theatre, dance, music, visual arts, and new art forms. Students will analyze, critique, and construct meanings from informal and formal theatre, film, television, and electronic media productions. Students will understand context by analyzing the role of theatre, film, television, and electronic media in the past and present.

Description: Guitar 1 is a beginner's course on how to play the guitar. This class will be offered both semesters and is open to all students 9th-12th grades and can be a great class to receive a fine arts credit. Students learn the basics of an acoustic guitar as well as the Nashville Numbers System (chords, tablature). Students are expected to complete weekly assignments with tests given periodically. There will be an end of the semester recital in class as well. Students will learn how to play both lead and rhythm guitar. Participation is the main part of the class. Students are encouraged to have access to an acoustic guitar with a strap, picks, and a capof or practice. There is no prerequisite to this course and there is no experience necessary.
Dual Studies Art Appreciation- Art 1030
Grade Level: 12
Credit: 1
Prerequisite: None
Description:Credits and 19 ACT on each English, Reading, and Math Subtest. This course is offered in conjunction with Roane State Community College to those students who meet the prescribed requirements.The courses will cover form and meaning in the visual arts.




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